Claw Back of Lost Trucking Jobs Encourages Logistics Industry Veteran Miguel Denga

Miguel Denga
2 min readDec 9, 2020

An uptick in demand of physical goods, largely driven by stay-at-home orders as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, has spurred many industries into action. Chief among them is the freight brokerage and truck shipping sectors. The need to get products across state lines in the continental U.S. has never been greater, says industry veteran Miguel Denga. Mr. Denga has been involved in freight brokerage for more than 15 years and knows that every shipment rolling off a loading dock is the end result of a vast array of logistical arrangements. Today, Miguel Denga leads Denga Enterprises and its shipping services across 48 U.S. states. Companies requiring trucking/delivery services have been able to meet the demands of their customers throughout this difficult year. What’s more, trends expected in 2021 will make logistics more important than ever.

According to a Dec. 4, 2020 article from FreightWaves.com, the trucking industry is seeing a slow claw-back of jobs lost earlier this year due to the pandemic. “There was an accelerated pace of hiring at trucking firms in November, but the fact that employment is still so far below year-earlier levels suggests a combination of hiring headwinds (it takes time to get drivers trained up) and firms still skittish about the long-term outlook for demand,” an economic research director told the news outlet. More specifically, about 20,000 trucking jobs have been added to the U.S. workforce in the past three months. Miguel Denga, having spent nine years as the vice president of another freight brokerage firm, is happy to see across-the-board gains in his line of work. He’s also encouraged by the fact that jobs added aren’t just behind-the-wheel drivers; they include office roles and these positions at Denga Enterprises are often as critical as those tasked with actual transportation to the destination.

This brings us to the next core element of the freight-hauling business: the people who make the seemingly impossible possible. Miguel Denga says that if it weren’t for the family of employees in his motor carrier business, then the metrics of success his company currently records wouldn’t exist. Mr. Denga took his experience in this line of work and turned it into an offering that companies need to meet consumer expectations. This includes food and beverage firms, the oil and auto industry, industrial companies, general freight and much more. Each of these sectors have different time tables, expedited needs and less-than-truckload deliveries. Further, the clients on the receiving end have varying expectations on when their order will arrive as well as various other tracking and billing options. Miguel Denga says firms that can meet these expectations are the ones that will thrive in 2021.

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Miguel Denga
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Miguel Denga is a trucking logistics industry veteran. Get his take on the future of the sector here.